vieren-power-players-joey-gollish
vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

Joey Gollish is a jack of all trades. The 27-year-old from Toronto is the founder, designer, and creative director behind emerging menswear brand Mr. Saturday and member of creative incubator HXOUSE—but that’s not his first business venture. Gollish’s entrepreneurship journey started when he realized he felt unfulfilled at a summer job working in the tech department of St. Michael’s hospital. He set goals for himself and started two tech companies called Addo Labs and Openhouse. Still not completely satisfied, he discovered his passion for design through the repurposing of vintage clothes and set out to start his own cut-and-sew clothing line.

Four years later and the result is Mr. Saturday—a notable luxury streetwear brand. Gollish’s accolades keep climbing with multiple fashion weeks, immersive experiences, and global pop-ups under his belt. Gollish knows firsthand the benefits and challenges of entrepreneurship and his problem-solving skills are on par with his creativity. We chat below about mentorship, the advice he’d give his younger self, and where he sees himself in the future.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

Joey Gollish is a jack of all trades. The 27-year-old from Toronto is the founder, designer, and creative director behind emerging menswear brand Mr. Saturday and member of creative incubator HXOUSE—but that’s not his first business venture. Gollish’s entrepreneurship journey started when he realized he felt unfulfilled at a summer job working in the tech department of St. Michael’s hospital. He set goals for himself and started two tech companies called Addo Labs and Openhouse. Still not completely satisfied, he discovered his passion for design through the repurposing of vintage clothes and set out to start his own cut-and-sew clothing line.

Four years later and the result is Mr. Saturday—a notable luxury streetwear brand. Gollish’s accolades keep climbing with multiple fashion weeks, immersive experiences, and global pop-ups under his belt. Gollish knows firsthand the benefits and challenges of entrepreneurship and his problem-solving skills are on par with his creativity. We chat below about mentorship, the advice he’d give his younger self, and where he sees himself in the future.

“I like to know what goes into each piece and how I can technically improve on it.”

“I like to know what goes into each piece and how I can technically improve on it.”

What are you doing when you feel most passionate?

You caught me at my most passionate time. In [about] two weeks, on February 17th, we have our second fashion show with New York Fashion Week. We’re filming that on February 12th, and the two weeks leading up to any runway presentation is when I’m the most hands-on creating clothing, making as many creative decisions as I can, and working nonstop. My weeks are weird because I start Monday at 7 a.m. but I keep staying up later, and so I wake up later, but it’s 15 hour days of pure creation and that’s my favourite thing. Then, at the end of that, where you get to see what’s been in my mind for that runway presentation—those moments are when I feel the most passionate about what I’m doing.

What was the first moment that you felt successful?

The first moment doing this that I felt successful was when I had only been repurposing vintage clothing but I knew I wanted to do cut-and-sew and actually make my own line. I convinced Aidan from TNT to let me sell my stuff in their store, and at that moment, I was like “yeah I made it. I’m selling my clothes in a store.”

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

What are you doing when you feel most passionate?

You caught me at my most passionate time. In [about] two weeks, on February 17th, we have our second fashion show with New York Fashion Week. We’re filming that on February 12th, and the two weeks leading up to any runway presentation is when I’m the most hands-on creating clothing, making as many creative decisions as I can, and working nonstop. My weeks are weird because I start Monday at 7 a.m. but I keep staying up later, and so I wake up later, but it’s 15 hour days of pure creation and that’s my favourite thing. Then, at the end of that, where you get to see what’s been in my mind for that runway presentation—those moments are when I feel the most passionate about what I’m doing.

What was the first moment that you felt successful?

The first moment doing this that I felt successful was when I had only been repurposing vintage clothing but I knew I wanted to do cut-and-sew and actually make my own line. I convinced Aidan from TNT to let me sell my stuff in their store, and at that moment, I was like “yeah I made it. I’m selling my clothes in a store.”

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish
vieren-power-players-joey-gollish
vieren-power-players-joey-gollish
vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

What struggles have you had to overcome to pursue your passions?

Education—so learning how to make clothing. I really like to understand what I’m doing, I don’t want to just be drawing things and telling a factory to make them, I like to know what goes into each piece and how I can technically improve on it. The biggest barrier has been education, which has come through practice and beyond that. Starting a clothing brand is one thing, but starting a fashion brand is a whole other beast. Starting to get accepted in that community as an outsider from Toronto was a huge step that we had to overcome to get to where we are today.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

I don’t have any regrets, I believe everything happens for a reason. Some advice I would give my younger self is to have better friends and people around you. It’s like the saying “show me your friends, I’ll show you who you are.” The biggest thing for anyone who’s successful is the people they surround themselves with. Those people will have a huge persuasion on who you are and what you do.

What is cool to you?

I resonate with anything being authentic or raw, that’s what really gets me excited. I don’t love when anything —whether it’s clothing, music, or movies, is overproduced. I like when it’s [a] purity of vision and craft from any artist. Whether that’s actual art or just meeting people, as long as it’s not contrived that’s my favorite thing, that’s what’s cool.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

What struggles have you had to overcome to pursue your passions?

Education—so learning how to make clothing. I really like to understand what I’m doing, I don’t want to just be drawing things and telling a factory to make them, I like to know what goes into each piece and how I can technically improve on it. The biggest barrier has been education, which has come through practice and beyond that. Starting a clothing brand is one thing, but starting a fashion brand is a whole other beast. Starting to get accepted in that community as an outsider from Toronto was a huge step that we had to overcome to get to where we are today.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

I don’t have any regrets, I believe everything happens for a reason. Some advice I would give my younger self is to have better friends and people around you. It’s like the saying “show me your friends, I’ll show you who you are.” The biggest thing for anyone who’s successful is the people they surround themselves with. Those people will have a huge persuasion on who you are and what you do.

What is cool to you?

I resonate with anything being authentic or raw, that’s what really gets me excited. I don’t love when anything —whether it’s clothing, music, or movies, is overproduced. I like when it’s [a] purity of vision and craft from any artist. Whether that’s actual art or just meeting people, as long as it’s not contrived that’s my favorite thing, that’s what’s cool.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish
vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

“Mentorship in any form is super important, whether that’s someone you look up to, a friend, or even just reading.”

“Mentorship in any form is super important, whether that’s someone you look up to, a friend, or even just reading.”

Where does your confidence come from?

I genuinely believe that anything I put my mind to I can do, I obviously have doubts it’s not like I think I can do something and there’s no chance I’m going to fail. For me, I will only do things that I really like and I always try to have this perspective on anything I’m pursuing, where it’s like, if this is the last thing that I ever do for this job, I’ll be fine with that. It’s kind of a nothing to lose mentality.

Have you had any mentors on your journey?

In the last few years, mentorship has been the biggest part of my journey. Joining the HXOUSE program in 2018 [was] the biggest change in trajectory for my whole career. Getting to work really closely with La Mar Taylor, Ahmed Ismali, Iva Zelic and seeing how they operate as a team and the things they were able to accomplish by starting HXOUSE was super inspiring. Also the ability to hit these people up and run my ideas by them or talk to them about opportunities I think I should or shouldn’t take. I know I wouldn’t be where I am right now without them, maybe I could still do what I’m doing but it would for sure take longer and I would make a lot more mistakes. Mentorship in any form is super important, whether that’s someone you look up to, a friend, or even just reading. I find mentorship through books that I read when I can’t find answers in people I know—I would highly recommend anybody do that.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

Where does your confidence come from?

I genuinely believe that anything I put my mind to I can do, I obviously have doubts it’s not like I think I can do something and there’s no chance I’m going to fail. For me, I will only do things that I really like and I always try to have this perspective on anything I’m pursuing, where it’s like, if this is the last thing that I ever do for this job, I’ll be fine with that. It’s kind of a nothing to lose mentality.

Have you had any mentors on your journey?

In the last few years, mentorship has been the biggest part of my journey. Joining the HXOUSE program in 2018 [was] the biggest change in trajectory for my whole career. Getting to work really closely with La Mar Taylor, Ahmed Ismali, Iva Zelic and seeing how they operate as a team and the things they were able to accomplish by starting HXOUSE was super inspiring. Also the ability to hit these people up and run my ideas by them or talk to them about opportunities I think I should or shouldn’t take. I know I wouldn’t be where I am right now without them, maybe I could still do what I’m doing but it would for sure take longer and I would make a lot more mistakes. Mentorship in any form is super important, whether that’s someone you look up to, a friend, or even just reading. I find mentorship through books that I read when I can’t find answers in people I know—I would highly recommend anybody do that.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish
vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

What do you keep in mind when bringing your brand to life with physical experiences?

As we’ve gotten more serious with what we’re doing, we write down what our brand pillars are, and then it’s [focusing on] how can we manifest those pillars into something physical for people. All my collections have been historically based on nightclubs and their contributions to society and when we do that we take posters and newspaper articles and we turn them into different graphics to tell the story through the collection. So when we make a physical space I’m always like “how can we give people an opportunity to create some ephemera from here so that 20 years from now there’s something from that Mr. Saturday pop-up in their first season in Paris.” We try to show our archives and research through what we do and I always want Mr. Saturday to feel foreign but approachable. I’m trying to provide a different perspective on how I see history and society evolving and I want to create an environment that feels like maybe you were invited into something you never had access to before but it’s super welcoming.

If you could spend one night at a nightclub from the past which one would it be and why?

My research for this [latest] collection has been a lot about the 1920s and it wasn’t so much nightclubs but they had this one party in the 1920s that was called “The Bottle and Bath Party” and it was this group of people who were effectively protesting the way of life at [that] time and wanted to live in debauchery and decadence. They threw this party where they went to public baths, essentially just a big swimming pool, and they brought all their alcohol and everybody was in bathing suits, which was not something you did in public at the time, and 50 people threw what looked like the party of a generation from 4 p.m. one day to 8 a.m. the next day. [It was] at this public bath called St George’s Swimming Baths in London, it doesn’t exist anymore and I can’t find any pictures from it, so I’m curious to see what it looked like if it’s as cool as I thought and also just want to go.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

What do you keep in mind when bringing your brand to life with physical experiences?

As we’ve gotten more serious with what we’re doing, we write down what our brand pillars are, and then it’s [focusing on] how can we manifest those pillars into something physical for people. All my collections have been historically based on nightclubs and their contributions to society and when we do that we take posters and newspaper articles and we turn them into different graphics to tell the story through the collection. So when we make a physical space I’m always like “how can we give people an opportunity to create some ephemera from here so that 20 years from now there’s something from that Mr. Saturday pop-up in their first season in Paris.” We try to show our archives and research through what we do and I always want Mr. Saturday to feel foreign but approachable. I’m trying to provide a different perspective on how I see history and society evolving and I want to create an environment that feels like maybe you were invited into something you never had access to before but it’s super welcoming.

If you could spend one night at a nightclub from the past which one would it be and why?

My research for this [latest] collection has been a lot about the 1920s and it wasn’t so much nightclubs but they had this one party in the 1920s that was called “The Bottle and Bath Party” and it was this group of people who were effectively protesting the way of life at [that] time and wanted to live in debauchery and decadence. They threw this party where they went to public baths, essentially just a big swimming pool, and they brought all their alcohol and everybody was in bathing suits, which was not something you did in public at the time, and 50 people threw what looked like the party of a generation from 4 p.m. one day to 8 a.m. the next day. [It was] at this public bath called St George’s Swimming Baths in London, it doesn’t exist anymore and I can’t find any pictures from it, so I’m curious to see what it looked like if it’s as cool as I thought and also just want to go.

JOEY'S FAVOURITE

vieren-matte-white-rectangular-automatic-watch
vieren-matte-white-watch-joey-gollish

JOEY'S FAVOURITE

vieren-matte-white-rectangular-automatic-watch
vieren-matte-white-watch-joey-gollish
vieren-power-players-joey-gollish
vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

Tell us about a time you were inspired by someone you admire?

This is going to sound corny but today. I’ve been working really late non-stop and there have been some challenging moments lately. I woke up being like: there’s nothing I would like more than to relax for a minute so I can feel better, but then I saw La Mar Taylor posted that he, Abel, Cash, and Sal were on the cover of Billboard and had this cover story. His caption was “if you had told me 10 years ago when I was homeless, sleeping on the floor, with $50 to my name that I would be on the cover of Billboard with my best friends I would have believed you.” That was really inspiring.

How do you power your time?

I don’t know if I’m the best at managing my personal time but I dedicate a lot to my work. If you ask anybody who knows me, they call it “Joe time” and I’m late for everything because I always think I can get a million things done. For me because I have to bounce between being creative and being business-minded it’s about going with whatever flow of energy I feel at the time and leveraging that. So if I feel creative then doing that creative work for as long as I can, a lot of the time when I wake up in the morning I focus on administrative stuff and I try to segment it out.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

Tell us about a time you were inspired by someone you admire?

This is going to sound corny but today. I’ve been working really late non-stop and there have been some challenging moments lately. I woke up being like: there’s nothing I would like more than to relax for a minute so I can feel better, but then I saw La Mar Taylor posted that he, Abel, Cash, and Sal were on the cover of Billboard and had this cover story. His caption was “if you had told me 10 years ago when I was homeless, sleeping on the floor, with $50 to my name that I would be on the cover of Billboard with my best friends I would have believed you.” That was really inspiring.

How do you power your time?

I don’t know if I’m the best at managing my personal time but I dedicate a lot to my work. If you ask anybody who knows me, they call it “Joe time” and I’m late for everything because I always think I can get a million things done. For me because I have to bounce between being creative and being business-minded it’s about going with whatever flow of energy I feel at the time and leveraging that. So if I feel creative then doing that creative work for as long as I can, a lot of the time when I wake up in the morning I focus on administrative stuff and I try to segment it out.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

“I love fashion so much, it’s the [purest] form of creativity to me but I [also] have passions in tech and problem-solving.”

“I love fashion so much, it’s the [purest] form of creativity to me but I [also] have passions in tech and problem-solving.”

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

I think about stuff like this a lot but I don’t have a timeline on it—let’s just say the future. My biggest goals are growing Mr. Saturday to be a household brand name, continuing to do our runway work, and then growing that into a main line that becomes staples for people. To be able to give back through all that work and grow how we give back as we grow is really important to me. I definitely want to take my design perspective out of my brand and into other brands, whether that means being a creative director for a fashion house or even taking that beyond fashion into a different realm. I love fashion so much, it’s the [purest] form of creativity to me but I [also] have passions in tech and problem-solving. So beyond [fashion] how can I use what I’m creating right now to benefit the world and the future. Creating a company that does something in the realm of sustainability either in fashion or something else is probably on the trajectory for my lifetime.

vieren-power-players-joey-gollish

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

I think about stuff like this a lot but I don’t have a timeline on it—let’s just say the future. My biggest goals are growing Mr. Saturday to be a household brand name, continuing to do our runway work, and then growing that into a main line that becomes staples for people. To be able to give back through all that work and grow how we give back as we grow is really important to me. I definitely want to take my design perspective out of my brand and into other brands, whether that means being a creative director for a fashion house or even taking that beyond fashion into a different realm. I love fashion so much, it’s the [purest] form of creativity to me but I [also] have passions in tech and problem-solving. So beyond [fashion] how can I use what I’m creating right now to benefit the world and the future. Creating a company that does something in the realm of sustainability either in fashion or something else is probably on the trajectory for my lifetime.

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